Lumpkin Family Reunion

Last weekend, Deb’s and I went to King and Queen Co. with my dad and other family members for the 60th annual family reunion. It was held at Upper King and Queen Co Baptist Church, and the second one I have ever been to. The actual reunion was a dud – we didn’t know a soul there other than close family – but some decent food!

This church itself was quite interesting. The church was built in sometime in the late 1700’s or early 1800’s, but existed in the 1770’s. We walked around the core of the sanctuary, and I took a few pictures. Its only about 45 minutes from Richmond, and wasn’t to hard to find either. While I didn’t remember it, I had been to this church easily 20 years ago when my grandpa died. My Grandpa (who died of MS) as well as my great-grandpa and great-grandma (who died in the early 1950’s) are both buried here, as well as many close family ties over the years (even though many of us have been in the Richmond-metro area well over 50 years.

I had anticipated going up there and meeting a bunch of people I had never known but have a connection with and seeing what we can do, especially online. That did not end up being the case. While there was a WIDE range of ages there, it was funny that only a few people had an email address (heck, even some people wrote in the book ‘i don’t know what that is!’). I was hoping to get even more people on to a service like Geni.com, but oh well.

After eating there was a rather interesting (at least to me) talk from a family member, who published a book of the family in the early 1990’s. The day before celebrated the 300th anniversary of the death of the first ‘Lumpkin’ in the US, who was buried not to far from the church. We also learned about a few cool connections of our family to historic features like Carter Braxton and Patrick Henry. Carter Braxton not only lived in the same location as Jacob Lumpkin later on (Newington), but also had great-grandparents that were Lumpkins. Carter Braxton was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence for VA. We also found out (though the details are rough), that a member of the Lumpkin family married Patrick Henry’s daughter, Anne.

After the talk, we ended up taking a walk through the graveyard mentioned above. My dad and his brothers and one of his sisters were talking about everyone they knew buried there, and connections to many of the families that were in this yard. It was actually fun trying to remember ‘wow, I was here 20 years ago, do I remember anything?’

I have uploaded the rest of the pictures to Flickr, so please check them out!

Listening To: ‘You’re the good things’ by Modest Mouse

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